How to publish and handle Domain Events

2019-06-19 UPDATE: Please check Handling Domain Events: Missing Part post which is a continuation of this article

Introduction

Domain Event is one of the building blocks of Domain Driven Design. It is something that happened in particular domain and it captures memory of it. We create Domain Events to notify other parts of the same domain that something interesting happened and these other parts potentially can react to.

Domain Event is usually immutable data-container class named in the past tense. For example:

Three ways of publishing domain events

I have seen mainly three ways of publishing domain events.

1. Using static DomainEvents class

This approach was presented by Udi Dahan in his Domain Events Salvation post. In short, there is a static class named DomainEvents with method Raise and it is invoked immediately when something interesting during aggregate method processing occurred. Word immediately is worth emphasizing because all domain event handlers start processing immediately too (even aggregate method did not finish processing).

2. Raise event returned from aggregate method

This is approach when aggregate method returns Domain Event directly to ApplicationService. ApplicationService decides when and how to raise event. You can become familiar with this way of raising events reading Jan Kronquist Don’t publish Domain Events, return them! post.

3. Add event to Events Entity collection.

In this way on every entity, which creates domain events, exists Events collection. Every Domain Event instance is added to this collection during aggregate method execution. After execution, ApplicationService (or other component) reads all Eventscollections from all entities and publishes them. This approach is well described in Jimmy Bogard post A better domain events pattern.

Handling domain events

The way of handling of domain events depends indirectly on publishing method. If you use DomainEvents static class, you have to handle event immediately. In other two cases you control when events are published as well handlers execution – in or outside existing transaction.

In my opinion it is good approach to always handle domain events in existing transaction and treat aggregate method execution and handlers processing as atomic operation. This is good because if you have a lot of events and handlers you do not have to think about initializing connections, transactions and what should be treat in “all-or-nothing” way and what not.

Sometimes, however, it is necessary to communicate with 3rd party service (for example e-mail or web service) based on Domain Event. As we know, communication with 3rd party services is not usually transactional so we need some additional generic mechanism to handle these types of scenarios. So I created Domain Events Notifications.

Domain Events Notifications

There is no such thing as domain events notifications in DDD terms. I gave that name because I think it fits best – it is notification that domain event was published.

Mechanism is pretty simple. If I want to inform my application that domain event was published I create notification class for it and as many handlers for this notification as I want. I always publish my notifications after transaction is committed. The complete process looks like this:

1. Create database transaction.
2. Get aggregate(s).
3. Invoke aggregate method.
4. Add domain events to Events collections.
5. Publish domain events and handle them.
6. Save changes to DB and commit transaction.
7. Publish domain events notifications and handle them.

How do I know that particular domain event was published?

First of all, I have to define notification for domain event using generics:

All notifications are registered in IoC container:

In EventsPublisher we resolve defined notifications using IoC container and after our unit of work is completed, all notifications are published:

This is how whole process looks like presented on UML sequence diagram:

You can think that there is a lot of things to remember and you are right!:) But as you can see whole process is pretty straightforward and we can simplify this solution using IoC interceptors which I will try to describe in another post.

Summary

1. Domain event is information about something which happened in the past in modeled domain and it is important part of DDD approach.
2. There are many ways of publishing and handling domain events – by static class, returning them, exposing by collections.
2. Domain events should be handled within existing transaction (my recommendation).
3. For non-trasactional operations Domain Events Notifications were introduced.

Related posts

Handling Domain Events: Missing Part
The Outbox Pattern

Processing commands with Hangfire and MediatR

In previous post about processing multiple instance aggregates of the same type I suggested to consider using eventual consistency approach. In this post I would like to present one way to do this.

Setup

In the beginning let me introduce stack of technologies/patterns:
1. Command pattern – I am using commands but they do not look like theses described in GoF book. They just simple classes with data and they implement IRequest  marker interface of MediatR.

2. Mediator pattern. I am using this pattern because i want to decouple my clients classes (commands invokers) from commands handlers. Simple but great library created by Jimmy Bogard named MediatR implements this pattern very well. Here is simple usage.

and handler:

3. Hangfire. Great open-source library for processing and scheduling background jobs even with GUI monitoring interface. This is where my commands are scheduled, executed and retried if error occured.

Problem

For some of my uses cases, I would like to schedule processing my commands, execute them parallel with retry option and monitor them. Hangfire gives me all these kind of features but I have to have public method which I have to pass to Hangifre method (for example BackgroundJob.Enqueue). This is a problem – with mediator pattern I cannot (and I do not want) pass public method of handler because I have decoupled it from invoker. So I need special way to integrate MediatR with Hangfire without affecting basic assumptions.

Solution

My solution is to have three additional classes:
1. CommandsScheduler – serializes commands and sends them to Hangfire.

2. CommandsExecutor – responods to Hangfire jobs execution, deserializes commands and sends them to handlers using MediatR.

3. MediatorSerializedObject – wrapper class for serialized/deserialized commands with additional properties – command type and additional description.

Finally with this implementation we can change our client clasess to use CommandsScheduler:

and our commands are scheduled, invoked and monitored by Hangfire. I sketched sequence diagram which shows this interaction:

Processing commands with MediatR and Hanfire

Additionally, we can introduce interface for CommandsSchedulerICommandsScheduler. Second implementation will not use Hangfire at all and only will execute MediatR requests directly – for example in development process when we do not want start Hangfire Server.

Summary

I presented the way of processing commands asynchronously using MediatR and Hangfire. With this approach we have:
1. Decoupled invokers and handlers of commands.
2. Scheduling commands mechanism.
3. Invoker and handler of command may be other processes.
4. Commands execution monitoring.
5. Commands execution retries mechanism.

These benefits are very important during development using eventual consistency approach. We have more control over commands processing and we can react quickly if problem will appear.